Producer Page: Spring

It’s been a tough spring…I hope you have been able to make some planting progress this week with the improving weather.   Remember to be careful as you work toward the finish line!

One thing to be checking at this time- We are seeing some poor emergence in some fields in Faribault County, with a little bit of replanting. Depending on the planting date and soil types, there were some soils that stayed too wet for too long and also there are some crusting issues. Take a few minutes to check your corn fields and where the stands are thin, dig up some seed and see if it is still viable. If seed looks ok and if some seedlings look like they may be leafing out underground, it is time to dig out the rotary hoe. If the seed is looking mushy with no shoot emerging, it may be time to consider replanting those spots. Luckily, this is not a widespread issue, but please do check it out.

First rainy day that you can’t get into the field, make an appointment to visit your grain bins. We’ve had a lot of weather/temperature variation, please make sure that you don’t have any grain condition problems developing.

One last thing…if you carry hail insurance, it is time to make sure coverage is in place. Feel free to call me about this if you have any questions or need assistance.

Good Luck Out There!!!

Mark

 

Mark Producer Page headshotAbout Mark Warmka

Mark has worked at Peoples State Bank since 2003, serving as lead agricultural lending officer and bank Senior Vice President. He is also a member of the Board of Directors. Mark has an extensive background in the financial services industry, possessing both investment and insurance licensing and is fully accredited as a crop insurance agent.

He and his wife, Kate, an elementary teacher in Blue Earth, live on and manage the home farm near Easton. Their daughter, Amanda, is a Physician Assistant at UHD Hospital and daughter, Sara, is teaching and coaching at Fairmont Public Schools. 

You can reach Mark by email or at 507-553-3155.

» More blog posts by Mark here

Producer Page: Weather Delays Corn Planting, Optimal Window Open

I thought this was a nice article by the University of Minnesota Extension regarding our late start this spring: Weather Delays Corn Planting but Optimal Window Remains Open.

 

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 2018

Weather Delays Corn Planting but Optimal Window Remains Open

 
By Lizabeth Stahl, Jeff Coulter, and Dave Nicolai

Much of Minnesota has been covered in snow past mid-April and it will take some time for field conditions to dry enough for field work and planting to begin. Farmers are encouraged to consider the following as they wait for the 2018 corn planting season to begin. 

Snow-covered field in Southern MN, April 19, 2018.
Photo:  Liz Stahl



Planting date: University of Minnesota studies show that corn yield is typically maximized when planting occurs from late April through mid-May. In research conducted at Lamberton, Morris, and Waseca from 2009 to 2011, corn yield was maximized when planting occurred between April 25 and May 15. In long-term research conducted at Lamberton from 1988 to 2003, corn yield was maximized when planting occurred from April 21 to May 6, and reduced by just 5% when planting was delayed until May 15. Minnesota corn growers have achieved good yields in the past several years even when the average corn planting date (50% of the corn planted in the state) has been April 29 for the years 2014-2016 and May 7 in 2017.

Hybrid maturity: Although planting delays raise questions about when to switch to earlier-maturity hybrids, a general guideline in Minnesota is to stay with planned choices unless planting is delayed beyond the third week of May. When planting occurs between May 25 to May 31, a hybrid that is 5 to 7 relative maturity units earlier than full-season for the region is suggested to reduce risk of corn freezing in the fall before reaching maturity. 

 
Keep in mind what your starting point is for hybrid maturity. Many farmers plant hybrids that are not quite full-season for the area to limit drying costs after harvest Switching to an earlier-maturity hybrid too early could reduce yield potential. Other considerations include: 1) the number of corn acres one intends to plant and time required to plant these acres, 2) labor availability during planting, and 3) availability and suitability of earlier-maturity hybrids for your farm. 

Planting corn for grain after May 31 in Minnesota carries high risk of reduced yield and test weight and increased harvest moisture and dockage at the elevator. If corn must be planted after May 31 in Minnesota, planting a hybrid about 15 or more relative maturity units earlier than full-season for the region can help reduce risk. At June 5 or later, a crop other than corn should be considered, although this decision will need to be evaluated on a field by field basis. 

Soil conditions: Although timely planting is important, it is also important to avoid planting when soils are too wet. Sidewall compaction and poor seed-to-soil contact (cloddy soil structure) can result in poor root growth and poor stands. Even though soil temperatures may be cold now, by the time the snow melts, fields dry, and soils are dry enough for planting, it will be late April to early May and warmer soil temperatures are expected soon afterward. Unless cold weather is forecast soon after planting, soil temperature should not greatly influence this year’s planting decisions in Minnesota. 

Minnesota weather forecast (optimism for the short term): According to the National Weather Service, springtime conditions are in the forecast for the next week. At this time, the only real risk of precipitation for the next seven days is on Tuesday, April 24, with the outlook calling for a quarter to a half inch of precipitation over southern and central Minnesota. The snow pack that remains will rapidly erode with high temperatures in the 50's and 60's, and overnight lows above freezing. 

The longer range picture from eight to 14 days from the Climate Prediction Center for the period ending May 3 has normal-like temperatures, which for early May means high temperatures in the mid 60's and lows in the mid 40's. There is a chance, however, of above normal precipitation from April 27 to May 3. 

Additional resources: For more resources about corn production, visit Extension’s corn production website: www.z.umn.edu/corn.

Mark

 

Mark Producer Page headshotAbout Mark Warmka

Mark has worked at Peoples State Bank since 2003, serving as lead agricultural lending officer and bank Senior Vice President. He is also a member of the Board of Directors. Mark has an extensive background in the financial services industry, possessing both investment and insurance licensing and is fully accredited as a crop insurance agent.

He and his wife, Kate, an elementary teacher in Blue Earth, live on and manage the home farm near Easton. Their daughter, Amanda, is a Physician Assistant at UHD Hospital and daughter, Sara, is teaching and coaching at Fairmont Public Schools. 

You can reach Mark by email or at 507-553-3155.

» More blog posts by Mark here

Machinery Maintenance

Machinery Maintenance

As we are now starting to wind down for the harvest season, it is time to tend to our farm equipment. Examining for needed repairs and checking all vital systems.

NO….I am not talking about your combine or tractor…..I am talking about your most versatile and essential machine…YOU.

It has been a hard grind of a fall and most of us have not tended to our health as we should. Eating a less than nutritious diet (Mountain Dew and Doritos doesn’t count). Not enough sleep, too much worry and stress, etc. can lead to a rapid decline in your short term health.  

Time to take some preventative maintenance action! Schedule appointments with the dentist, eye doctor, and your family doctor. Now! You often don’t hesitate to invest in GPS gadgets for your tractor or to pamper your pickup, so why shouldn’t you give yourself some much needed attention.

It is important that you stay ahead of potential threats to your well-being by taking proactive steps. Visiting with your physician to conduct an assessment of your particular risks is a good starting point.

As long as we are on the health care subject…it is time for you to be considering your options on health insurance. If you need an individual plan you can shop on-line for the best option.  If this is somewhat confusing for you, contact an insurance professional who is qualified to counsel you as to the choices available and the cost structure. This can be a major cost but you might be able to use it as an opportunity to improve coverage and/or contain premiums with some proper planning. You need to move quickly on this, as it can be a complicated process.

Mark

 

About Mark Warmka

Mark has worked at Peoples State Bank since 2003, serving as lead agricultural lending officer and bank Senior Vice President. He is also a member of the Board of Directors. Mark has an extensive background in the financial services industry, possessing both investment and insurance licensing and is fully accredited as a crop insurance agent.

He and his wife, Kate, an elementary teacher in Blue Earth, live on and manage the home farm near Easton. Their daughter, Amanda, is a Physician Assistant at UHD Hospital and daughter, Sara, is teaching and coaching at Fairmont Public Schools. 

You can reach Mark by email or at 507-553-3155.

» More blog posts by Mark here

Producer Page: Machinery Maintenance

As we are now starting to wind down for the harvest season, it is time to tend to our farm equipment. Examining for needed repairs and checking all vital systems.

NO….I am not talking about your combine or tractor…..I am talking about your most versatile and essential machine…YOU.

It has been a hard grind of a fall and most of us have not tended to our health as we should. Eating a less than nutritious diet (Mountain Dew and Doritos doesn’t count). Not enough sleep, too much worry and stress, etc. can lead to a rapid decline in your short term health.  

Time to take some preventative maintenance action! Schedule appointments with the dentist, eye doctor, and your family doctor. Now! You often don’t hesitate to invest in GPS gadgets for your tractor or to pamper your pickup, so why shouldn’t you give yourself some much needed attention.

It is important that you stay ahead of potential threats to your well-being by taking proactive steps. Visiting with your physician to conduct an assessment of your particular risks is a good starting point.

As long as we are on the health care subject…it is time for you to be considering your options on health insurance. If you need an individual plan you can shop on-line for the best option.  If this is somewhat confusing for you, contact an insurance professional who is qualified to counsel you as to the choices available and the cost structure. This can be a major cost but you might be able to use it as an opportunity to improve coverage and/or contain premiums with some proper planning. You need to move quickly on this, as it can be a complicated process.

Mark

 

Mark Producer Page headshotAbout Mark Warmka

Mark has worked at Peoples State Bank since 2003, serving as lead agricultural lending officer and bank Senior Vice President. He is also a member of the Board of Directors. Mark has an extensive background in the financial services industry, possessing both investment and insurance licensing and is fully accredited as a crop insurance agent.

He and his wife, Kate, an elementary teacher in Blue Earth, live on and manage the home farm near Easton. Their daughter, Amanda, is a Physician Assistant at UHD Hospital and daughter, Sara, is teaching and coaching at Fairmont Public Schools. 

You can reach Mark by email or at 507-553-3155.

» More blog posts by Mark here